The views, thoughts and opinions expressed belong solely to the author. They are not and do not necessarily reflect the opinion(s) or position(s) of the organization, board of directors and/or any other individual(s) or entity (ies) affiliated or unaffiliated with Christians in Public Service, Inc


Dorothy Burton is a conference and keynote speaker; and, workshop leader for various organizations across the country. As a writer and speaker, Dorothy speaks and writes about public servant leadership, American culture, politics and the role of faith in the public square. She uses her gift of communication, depth of study in theology and vast experiences in public service to help leaders learn and discover more effective ways to lead, communicate, work and serve together for the common good of their team, organization and the diverse communities they serve.

Interested in having Dorothy speak at your event? Please complete the SPEAKING REQUEST below.

SPEAKING REQUEST


  

The Me I'm Supposed to Be
Wednesday, June 20, 2018 12:39 PM

The Me I'm Supposed to Be

Wednesday, June 20, 2018 12:39 PM
Wednesday, June 20, 2018 12:39 PM

Christians don't be so quick to criticize others if you're not willing to commit yourself to advancing the Kingdom. You do know that's your overarching purpose for being saved right?

It's not to cling to a political ideology, it's to cling to the cross. Politics and Christianity ARE NOT THE SAME! Politics is a world system under the influence of Satan. Christianity is God's system of GOVERNING and under the influence of the cross. Is there any wonder why Billy Graham expressed his deep concern about Christianity being overrun by the far right?

And he was right. Look - I USED to be a far right black conservative. Nobody, not my advisers, not my husband, not my friends, nobody could convince me otherwise.

Then God sat me down in seminary, did a LOOOONG work over a period of time in my heart and my mind. I've always been smart - had to be. God said he was going to use all that smartness and mouth and writing for HIS purposes.

I got spanked so bad and put back on that Potter's wheel so many times I ain't trying to go back to the woodshed.

God PREpares us for where He has already PRE-determined to place us on the battlefield. I so see it all now. I had to first learn the PLAYBOOK through higher education and from being IN the arena of politics for so long and serving as a government staff person, serving on boards then as a longtime elected and appointed official.

THEN I had to learn the STRATEGY through Him sending me to one of the most evangelical and conservative but EXCELLENT seminaries in the country.

THEN I had to follow his voice in founding an organization with NO money, no blueprint, no nothing but some good people he had PREordained because he told me exactly where to go and to whom.

And now here I am. No, I don't fit with women ministries, or conservative this or that. I don't. Not designed to. Others are, I'm not. My path is way different and it's an adventure with God every day.

I don't intend to offend as a matter of fact, I used to be SO careful not to offend white people and Republicans, after all, they I thought were my support. Then God hit me upside the head with a spiritual 2x4 to remind me that HE is my source. And it's Him I have to please, not people.

Why am I so bold and confident? Because I walk closely with Abba Father and He's guiding me.

Do I have concerns about losing friends, yep. But then I figure they weren' friends anyway, just political acquaintances. I don't know how all of this is going to play out, but I'm just going to trust God.

Why Are White Male Mass Shooters So Angry? Or Is It Anger? Part II
Saturday, June 2, 2018 3:25 PM

Why Are White Male Mass Shooters So Angry? Or Is It Anger? Part II

Saturday, June 2, 2018 3:25 PM
Saturday, June 2, 2018 3:25 PM

Texas Governor Greg Abbott holds a roundtable discussion at the state capital on May 24, 2018 with those impacted by the Santa Fe, Texas school shooting. Drew Anthony Smith/Getty

Dorothy Burton

It all began with an innocent Facebook post and question I posted on my Facebook page:

"I have a question. Since SMU has asked their faculty to ask questions of ethnic minorities they've always wanted to ask but were afraid to, I'm going to play SMU question and answer. My question is this. Why are young white males so angry? All these school shootings? White males. Columbine? Young white males. Sandy Hook? Young white male. The Charleston church massacre? Young white male. Sutherland Springs church massacre? White male. Aurora movie theater? Young white male. Las Vegas? White male. Santa Fe? White male. Parkland? White male. What are white males so angry about that they are committing all these mass murders in schools and churches? Yeah, I'm sure I will hear about Chicago and black-on-black crime. Those are one-on-one urban violence. But as far as I know these mass shootings of innocent church people and school children are angry young white males. And in the case of Las Vegas, just an angry old white man. I'm just asking what many of us talk about privately. What are y'all so angry about? Try being a black male for a minute. And I'm not being funny. But these are the kinds of issues that burn beneath the surface and cause so much outward hostility. I applaud SMU for what they're trying to do. But this is the white elephant (no pun intended) in every school or church massacre that nobody wants to talk about."

I was not prepared for the onslaught of responses. This is PART II of a three-part series.

The comments on my Facebook page are still rolling in.

While some comments are vicious, others are thoughtful and respectful. Nothing makes Americans' blood boil hotter than when conversations turn to issues of race. Particularly black and white because of our shared, nothing-to-be proud of history of slavery, systemic racism and mutual disdain by many on both sides.

When it comes to broaching anything involving race, it makes some uncomfortable, others angry.

But as Christians it shouldn't be this way. But it is. Why? Because the body of Christ for the most part has chosen to do as the world does and try its best to ignore the one issue that continues to deeply divide us.

The fact is while we are quick to call out "radical Islamic terrorists" for bombings and examine to the nth degree violence among young black males, we are less or not at all so inclined to call out the obvious when it comes to mass school and church shootings committed exclusively by young, white, obviously disturbed and angry males. That's the uncomfortable truth.

As a  Christ-centered educational and leadership organization rooted in biblical principles, we will not duck the hard issues. As a matter of fact, if the people of God refuse to seek biblical answers, choosing instead to blindly follow those who don't know our Savior and his word, who will?

Jesus left us with the message that we are salt and light.

As Christ followers we should be lighting the way and showing others the way. Yet, far too many of us are in the way.

As an organization we are committed to teaching truth and seeking answers.  Even when truth causes our sanctified blood to boil.

Governor Greg Abbott this past week, following a series of meetings with those impacted by the Santa Fe, Texas school shooting, released a 43-page report of proposed recommendations and legislative actions designed to deter future school shootings.

In the report are mentioned the usual - "harden" soft targets such as schools by increasing police and school marshal presence, persuade more school districts to join state programs for arming school staff - to which the Texas State Teachers Association strongly objects; mental health screenings and more ancillary and politically palatable solutions.

But nowhere in the report does it mention the  common profile of these mass shooters - male, white, young and in many instances angry. If the perpetrators were say, all Muslim, would that not be a factor to take into consideration?

When it comes to terrorist attacks, we have and do. Even to the point of President Trump's attempts to restrict entry of some immigrants into the United States from predominantly Muslim countries known to be bastions for terrorists and terror groups.

My question as innocent as it was, created a firestorm. Which ultimately may not be a bad thing. 

We too are seeking answers and want to help find solutions. We will not shy away from the white elephant (no pun intended) in the room, so clearly evident in these massacres.

We are not pointing fingers, blaming "the white guy for everything" as more than one commentator put it; nor are we putting down an entire race of people. Not anything remotely related to any of this.

I just pointed out the obvious and asked the question, why?

In Part II of this series, Keith Bilbrey offered these thoughts and observations.


By Guest Blogger
Keith Bilbrey

I've tried to stay out of this conversation, but feel led/driven to add my 2 cents. 

1) We've allowed our country to get away from our moral compass. Whether or not you believe in God, He has been driven out of our schools and society. I cannot allow my 8-year-old to watch prime-time television because of what she will encounter; much less watch anything on cable programming, without me there to censor and change the channel. You can blame music, videos, games, or whatever...our country has NO moral compass.

2) We have raised a generation (or two) of entitled human beings. They do not know what losing is. They have no clue what disappointment is. They are coddled and everyone gets a trophy. Because of this, they don't know how to handle the slightest disappointment. 

3) In many cases parents refuse to accept any responsibility for their child's actions or attitudes. The whole "not my child/what did you do to provoke my child" mentality our educators face on a daily basis is unfathomable. 

While the above are cross-cultural in nature, the predominant race to claim and have immediate access to such actions are Caucasian, but can be found in all races. 

David French, in a May 18, 2018 National Review article entitled,"The Best Explanation for Our Spate of Mass Shootings Is the Least Comforting,” (https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/why-do-mass-shootings-happen-best-explanation) references a study by Stanford sociologist Mark Granovetter and Malcolm Gladwell.

French wrote that in 2015 Malcolm Gladwell wrote what French believes is the “best explanation for modern American mass shootings and it’s easily the least comforting. At the risk of oversimplifying a complex argument, essentially he argues that each mass shooting lowers the threshold for the next. He argues, we are in the midst of a slow-motion “riot” of mass shootings, with the Columbine shooting in many ways the key triggering event.

Gladwell wrote… “But Granovetter thought it was a mistake to focus on the decision-making processes of each rioter in isolation. In his view, a riot was not a collection of individuals, each of whom arrived independently at the decision to break windows. A riot was a social process, in which people did things in reaction to and in combination with those around them. Social processes are driven by our thresholds—which he defined as the number of people who need to be doing some activity before we agree to join them. In the elegant theoretical model Granovetter proposed, riots were started by people with a threshold of zero—instigators willing to throw a rock through a window at the slightest provocation. Then comes the person who will throw a rock if someone else goes first. He has a threshold of one. Next in is the person with the threshold of two. His qualms are overcome when he sees the instigator and the instigator’s accomplice. Next to him is someone with a threshold of three, who would never break windows and loot stores unless there were three people right in front of him who were already doing that—and so on up to the hundredth person, a righteous upstanding citizen who nonetheless could set his beliefs aside and grab a camera from the broken window of the electronics store if everyone around him was grabbing cameras from the electronics store.

The point being that social media and media coverage have allowed those not at the “riot” to become participants. It has been easier to use Columbine as their triggering event.

I agree. Because of the initial Columbine shooting, those predisposed because of 1, or all 3, of the above listed are more apt to step out and act out.

One of the countries highly touted on gun control issues is Japan.

Until we as a country hold ourselves to a higher standard of morality and sense of right and wrong, the United States can never be judged alongside such a country.

The idea of acting out in such a manner as to discredit and dishonor ones family is unheard of. This is a country where public school children help in cooking lunch for the schools, they clean up the schools, they respect their teachers, their family, their neighbors and their community. They put others' needs ahead of their own. The thought of bringing shame to your family name is enough to keep the majority from acting out and disrespecting themselves or their family.

We must, as a country, decide that we will do better and that we will once again strive to raise responsible children that become responsible adults. We must stop raising a group of entitled brats that cannot handle disappointment. 

Now....I'm not a highly educated man, but I have lived long enough to see this from several points of view...I'm tired...but willing to do my part to help.

PART III, next week, what a cross section of Americans had to say on this issue...

Why Are White Male Mass Shooters So Angry? PART I
Thursday, May 24, 2018 5:46 PM

Why Are White Male Mass Shooters So Angry? PART I

Thursday, May 24, 2018 5:46 PM
Thursday, May 24, 2018 5:46 PM

Photo courtesy of Cox Media Group National Content Desk: WFTV9 ABC  Santa Fe School Shooting

It all began with an innocent Facebook post and question I posted on my Facebook page:

"I have a question. Since SMU has asked their faculty to ask questions of ethnic minorities they've always wanted to ask but were afraid to, I'm going to play SMU question and answer. My question is this. Why are young white males so angry? All these school shootings? White males. Columbine? Young white males. Sandy Hook? Young white male. The Charleston church massacre? Young white male. Sutherland Springs church massacre? White male. Aurora movie theater? Young white male. Las Vegas? White male. Santa Fe? White male. Parkland? White male. What are white males so angry about that they are committing all these mass murders in schools and churches? Yeah, I'm sure I will hear about Chicago and black-on-black crime. Those are one-on-one urban violence. But as far as I know these mass shootings of innocent church people and school children are angry young white males. And in the case of Las Vegas, just an angry old white man. I'm just asking what many of us talk about privately. What are y'all so angry about? Try being a black male for a minute. And I'm not being funny. But these are the kinds of issues that burn beneath the surface and cause so much outward hostility. I applaud SMU for what they're trying to do. But this is the white elephant (no pun intended) in every school or church massacre that nobody wants to talk about."

I was not prepared for the onslaught of responses!

Some angry, others well-thought through. While others predictably pointed fingers at Democrats, others blamed gun enthusiasts.

I believe bureaucrats don't have the answers and I personally do not believe there is the political will among the political establishment to make any substantive changes. Even more, to ask the tough and sometimes uncomfortable questions that need to be asked.

As a member of the NRA I personally believe in protecting the 2nd Amendment, but not blindly so. It may have less to do with the 2nd Amendment and more to do with federal and state governments providing funding to help local school districts combat this growing and insidious evil. 

But simply throwing money at social problems is rarely the answer.  We have to as leaders, be mature enough and have courage enough to have difficult and uncomfortable conversations.

Can we just lay all the cards on the table and stop playing political football with people's lives?

In my opinion no law, unless it is one of the ten handed down from God to Moses, is beyond the scope of tweaking if it no longer adequately covers and serves the purposes and safety of the American public; or, adequately addresses real-time issues.

None of us have all the answers, but together there is not much determined Americans can't do if we have the will and mind to do it.

The same old tired politically driven platitudes, "listening tours" and political posturing have gotten us nowhere and will get us nowhere. 

As committed of a Christian I am, even I am tired of politicians sending their "thoughts and prayers."

How about sending some leadership? Some solutions?

This series of blogs give voice to the thoughts of ordinary citizens like you, like me, without filters. I asked permission to reprint their comments from my Facebook page and this is the first in a four-part series.

Politicians need to hear beyond their "base" and hand-picked panels and really listen to what people are saying.

This first guest blog post, as posted to my Facebook page, is written by Lisa Prude Sams.


By Guest Blogger
Lisa Prude Sams

I "self-identify" as a white woman. I am a Christ follower, politically, fiscally and socially conservative.

I have a background/education as a Social Worker with adolescents, Minister to Women, and secular nonprofit leadership.

I am NOT a gun person, and I don't know enough about current gun laws or background checks to comment other than to say - if better, deeper, more extensive checks will help, then yes, do it!

And if restricting access to certain types of guns will help, I'm all in. 

I believe there is more to this than gun control. I believe that there are several root causes to this horror of young white males taking weapons to schools and churches, or anywhere else and killing their peers or strangers en masse.

Overall, it's a sin problem - which is the issue in each of my premises - it's ALL a sin problem. But, I want to break it down. As I use the pronoun "we", I mean "we, the white people."

It's a greed problem.

This is not a new phenomenon as some commentators try to portray.

For thousands of years, the group "in power" has devised ways to extinguish or subdue the non powerful - especially when the in-power feels threatened.

The Old Testament and secular history books are full of stories of young men seeking dominance.

The sinful desire to have superiority over God and to demonstrate control over their part of the world goes back to Cain and Abel (caveat: granted, they were not "white" as we understand the term today, however, it was a young man seeking dominance over the other, both of the same race).

In America, young white males have asserted dominance over pretty much everyone at one time or another: women, children, people of color, those less educated, etc.

There is, sadly, still a hierarchy and those at the perceived top do everything they can to stay at the top. 

It's a "drive-thru" problem.

I believe that since 1973 we have taught our children that they are disposable.

The moment abortion was fully legalized (outside the health of the mother or child or in cases of rape or incest) instead of being the exception, it became commonplace. In too many instances, it became a form of birth control.

The idea that having a child would prove embarrassing, inconvenient, or ill-advised, "so abort", gained a foothold in our society (non church-going as well as church-going). When we can dispose of a pregnancy in an afternoon, we can just as easily ignore the child once it arrives: day care, so-called latchkey children, and now we can just plop them down with a device and they can entertain themselves.

We drive through for food, coffee and even order groceries online because we are too busy to do it ourselves.

We've become too busy to make a pot of coffee and too busy to sit down and listen to our kids.

It's a "lack of good male role models" problem.

We (white people, especially us "church-going" white people) love to point to the problem of fatherless households in the "poor sections of town," but forget that the divorce rate of church-going whites is the same as non church-going whites. And, there are as many white teens getting pregnant and parenting without the father of the baby playing an active role.

After a divorce is final, moms typically have the bulk of responsibility for raising the children. And they usually have to either take on more work responsibility or go to work, which further cuts into the quantity and quality of parent-child time.

I am NOT saying that single moms aren't doing enough. I'm saying the opposite. They are overwhelmed and tired and carry the weight of the world. And if they have sons, they need a strong male role model. An in-your-face, on the front lines, role model. Not an every-other-weekend role model. Not a far away, unreachable, fictional movie/tv, sports role model. 

I don't like when people complain or accuse without offering solutions, so what can we do?

  1. We tell Americans, "If you see something, say something." From most of the reporting after these mass shooting by young white males, it comes to light that someone DID say something, but nothing happened. If it's a legal issue, let's fix it. If it's a source issue, seek a second source for confirmation. Let's respond quickly and decisively when someone says, "John Doe is posting scary stuff online", or "John Doe threatened Jack," or "John Doe is not acting like himself lately." Why is this so difficult to accomplish? 
  2. Teach the importance of respecting all people, all viewpoints, all ideas. It takes time, effort and accountability.
  3. In families, neighborhoods, friendships, we must offer tangible help to single parents. Two parent families can partner with a single parent family and triple team the kids! 
  4. At schools, we must partner with teachers, staff, school resource officers and volunteers to get to know EVERY student. Join, or support, the PTA. Did you know that in many school districts, you don't have to be a parent to join the PTA? You just have to be willing. And pass the background check.
  5. In churches, we must do better at partnering teenagers with mentors. Research consistently supports the idea that teenagers need at least two adults in their lives, other than their parents, to whom they can turn for advice, encouragement and guidance. If you have some extra time, volunteer in the children's or youth ministries. Get to know the kids and their parents. Be available.
  6. At home, no closed doors. No computers or phones or tablets except in the common areas of the house. No privacy settings on your kids' social media. Read EVERYTHING. Track EVERYTHING. It's not an invasion, it's protection. Your house, your rules. And, honestly, parents are as bad as kids. We've got an escalating pornography addiction problem in America because it's easy to access and easy to keep secret. When the adults in the house have secrets, they avoid confronting their kids' secrets. Adults need to deal with our addiction to our phones, too. It breaks my heart to see families at restaurants and each person at the table is on a phone or tablet. There are so many conversations that Americans need to be having as families, as friends, as churches, as communities/states, and as a nation.

But, as most things do, it takes courage to ask the hard questions and to listen to the responses.

With prayer, conversation, conviction, and willingness, we (all of us) can make changes.

You Can Be Arrogant and Smart - But If You're Smart You Won't Be Arrogant
Wednesday, May 16, 2018 2:34 PM

You Can Be Arrogant and Smart - But If You're Smart You Won't Be Arrogant

Wednesday, May 16, 2018 2:34 PM
Wednesday, May 16, 2018 2:34 PM

As public leaders, we care about our public image. Image is the root word of imagine.

The image you and I project is a reflection of who and what we want people to imagine us to be.

"Look at me! I project everything good and wholesome and right and clean. I am so much better than... just look at me." Really?

Image is not necessarily a bad thing. However, when you and I imagine we are more superior, more attractive, smarter; better than and more entitled than others because of position, pedigree or power - and snobbishly act it out as though it were true, it becomes an image of swagger and arrogance.

On the other hand, you and I can be genuine, selfless and without pretense - leading, guiding and serving others with excellence, humility and grace - that's smart.

You can be arrogant and smart; but if you're smart, you won't be arrogant.

Arrogance is a product of pride. God hates pride and pride is at the root of every public leader's fall from grace. Whether politician or preacher.

Not extramarital affairs. Not money laundering. Not fraud. Not bribery. Pride. Arrogance is the rotten fruit that grows from the rotten root - pride.

Pride makes us BELIEVE we can get away with these things. And in arrogance, we act them out.

It's the same trap so many get caught in. And in shame are rendered useless.

Arrogance builds the ego, but it rots the soul. 

Arrogance has cost millionaires their fortunes, professional athletes their careers, leaders and preachers their reputations, executives their positions and everyday people their livelihoods - leaving behind trails of wrecked lives, broken marriages and damaged families.

God is opposed to the proud, but gives grace to the humble (James 4:6 1 Peter 5:5).

Keep it real and stay humble.

Pride is the mousetrap and arrogance is the cheese. 


Dorothy Burton is the founder and Chief Executive Officer of Christians in Public Service, Inc. and the author of the book, Why We Fall.

She is a popular writer and speaker, speaking to faith and non-faith based groups, organizations and local governments on servant leadership and current events impacting public policy and American culture - offering practical and biblical solutions to common leadership challenges uncommon in 21st century public space.

Interested in having Dorothy speak at your event? Please complete the SPEAKING REQUEST below.

SPEAKING REQUEST

Bouncing Back From Defeat: What to do When You Run for Office But Lose
Tuesday, May 8, 2018 1:59 PM

Bouncing Back From Defeat: What to do When You Run for Office But Lose

Tuesday, May 8, 2018 1:59 PM
Tuesday, May 8, 2018 1:59 PM

Sometimes God allows us to lose a race to test how badly we want to serve. If you're the "one and done" typethat's all you will ever be.

And sometimes He allows defeat more than once. More than twice.

I lost my first city council race. I ran four subsequent times and never lost again.

Losing a political campaign hurts. You put in months sometimes years of hard work.

Unless one has lived through it, it is difficult to understand or comprehend the depth and width of pain.

You hurt not only for yourself and lost opportunity, but for the pain and disappointment of family and friends who lived and died with every insult, lie and misrepresentation of your character.

You feel you let down volunteers who spent hours away from their families and in some cases jobs to put out yard signs, make phone calls or work the polls.

You're on an emotional roller coaster.

If there is any consolation at all, and this is what I had to comfort myself with when I lost - know that God is yet in control.

He may not be saying no, just not yet. Or, as was the case with me, not this office but one even higher.

Scripture teaches that God withholds no good thing from us (Psalm 84:11). That includes the office or position He has pre-determined for us. He knows what is ahead and sometimes what appears to be defeat is actually protection; or, part of His perfecting process to prepare us for something more.

Defeat in the life of a Christian is either a delay or a detour.

What we think is best, could be far less than what God has purposed for us. And sometimes in order to get to the best, we have to experience the pain of loss along the way.

When I first ran and lost city council, I ran for a district seat. The citywide seat I would win five years later, had not even been created when I ran the first time. Wasn't even a thought.

The citizens voted on a city charter change, adding an additional at-large seat to the council.

My goal from the beginning was to serve in whatever capacity I could to make our city better.

When I lost, I continued to serve as a volunteer on city boards, the local chamber of commerce, in the Rotary Club; however and wherever I could help.

I kept the right attitude, right spirit, never lashed out at anyone and when the new citywide seat was created, even some who had opposed me five years earlier, joined with others to recruit me to run for the new citywide (at-large) seat.

If your heart's desire is to serve, don't be surprised when your heart is broken trying to serve.

If you really want to serve, a loss will never be a deterrent.

It's not losing, but how you lose. Even though losing hurts, it's a matter of if we can still praise God and serve with the same enthusiasm in defeat as we would have in victory. And, our willingness to trust God by getting back up again.

How to Handle the Loss

If you lose, it is imperative to do these five key things to recover, re-group and re-charge in ways that are healthy and productive:

  1. Be grateful for the opportunity to have run. Many who dream of running for elective office never make it past the dream. Express gratitude in tangible ways to those who helped you. They likely will not expect it but expressed gratitude goes a long way. If nothing more than a $25 gift card to a local restaurant. It's not the amount they'll remember, but the gesture. And, they will more likely sign up to volunteer next time.
  2. Keep smiling, keep serving, keep believing. Seek out other opportunities as quickly as possible to serve and let there be no task too menial. This shows humility, sincerity and those watching will be impressed by your willingness to still serve in a much lesser role.
  3. Never be bitter and if you are, never show it. It will pass. Figure out what you did wrong and determine not to do it next time around. Bitterness is always a turn off and no matter how much good you do subsequent to a bitter display of emotion, people will peg you a sore loser.
  4. Stay informed, stay involved, stay hungry and stay after it. People are more likely to vote for you the next time around if they have become more familiar with you and have become accustomed to seeing you around. You no longer will be just a name on the ballot, but a fellow volunteer, club or chamber member - even friend.
  5. Never place blame or point fingers.  This is never a good look! Accept loss as the will of the people, even more important, the will of God. We show respect for voters when we win and serve well.

We show more respect and class when we lose but still serve well.

People in many cases watch the reactions and actions of the loser more closely than the winner.

It's the same reason why people slow down in traffic to gawk at a car wreck.

Don't be the wreck many want to see. As a Christ follower, be the example many need to see!

Keep your head up and if I can encourage you with this last but most important thought - if God called you, He knows where to find you. And He already knew the outcome of the race before you even filed.

You may have lost the race, but God hasn't lost sight of you. In fact, He had his eye and hand on you the whole time. He still does.

He's not through with you, He's perfecting you. 

KSU - Keep. Showing. Up.


Dorothy Burton is the founder and Chief Executive Officer of Christians in Public Service, Inc. and the author of the book, Why We Fall.

She is a popular writer and speaker, speaking to faith and non-faith based groups, organizations and local governments on servant leadership and current events impacting public policy and American culture - offering practical and biblical solutions to common leadership challenges uncommon in 21st century public space.

Interested in having Dorothy speak at your event? Please complete the SPEAKING REQUEST below.

SPEAKING REQUEST

< view previous

Personal and Essential Leadership Qualities for Public Servant Leaders

Bouncing Back From Defeat: What To Do When You Run For Office But Lose