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The Reality of Conviction and Leadership
Tuesday, September 4, 2018 9:46 AM

The Reality of Conviction and Leadership

Tuesday, September 4, 2018 9:46 AM
Tuesday, September 4, 2018 9:46 AM

“Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything. #JustDoIt,” Colin Kaepernick, former San Francisco 49ers quarterback posted on Twitter Labor Day afternoon.

Nike has caused a firestorm by its corporate decision to use Kaepernick as the face of its 30th anniversary campaign.

Kaepernick in 2016 began kneeling during the playing of the national anthem prior to NFL games to protest police shootings and racial injustices against African Americans. The act was and is cursed by some, hailed by others, but nonetheless influenced players across the NFL to do the same.

"The movement also caught the attention of President Trump, who lambasted Kaepernick and other players who participated in the pregame protests. Last September, the president called on NFL owners to fire any player who kneeled during the national anthem." - FOXBusiness.com | 9.3.2018

MY TAKE ON KAEP

Every major cultural shift and change began with the courage of one person who had a conviction, rightly or wrongly so strong that nothing, not criticism, not loss of money, status, position or possessions, even the possibility of death couldn't deter them.

History is replete with them. Jesus himself had that kind of conviction. The founders of what would be America had that kind of conviction. Martin, Mandela, Hitler, Cassius Clay, had that kind of conviction.

More hated these men than loved them. Yet, they left their indelible mark on history and changed it. So will this man in this slice of culture. And there's nothing anybody can do about it.

Stop buying tickets, stop watching the games...even his conviction caused that and his place in history becomes even more solidified because his conviction caused YOU to change YOUR behavior.

That's what people with conviction do. Those who stopped buying tickets, watching the game...it was a decision made because of the actions of a person with this kind of conviction. Bending to the will of the convictor by forcing an unplanned change in personal behavior. Bringing even more attention to their cause. It's what people of conviction cause people to do.

Nobody ever knows, let alone remembers the names of the masses but history always records and remembers the name of the one who greatly impacted the masses.

MY TAKE ON THE PRESIDENT'S RESPONSE

Leaders by nature are problem solvers.

Leaders don't see a fire and run for the nearest can of gasoline.

For every man or woman of conviction who initiated a shift in culture, there was a leader to bring order to the pursuant chaos.

This unfortunately is not part of President Trump's DNA. He is an antagonist who thrives on chaos and where there is none, he creates it. The opposite historically has not been the case.

Imagine an MLK without an LBJ; a Hitler without a Churchill or a Roosevelt.

A leader understands that both sides are both right and both sides are both wrong and has the strength of character, temperament, wisdom, courage and moral compass to work with both sides, taking neither side; for the good of the whole.

True leaders don't lambast, they lead.

The culture is shifting on both sides. The tragedy is instead of leaders reaching for solutions they keep running for more gas cans.


Dorothy Burton is an author, conference and keynote speaker for various organizations and governments across the country. She is the author of the new book, Why We Fall: The Power of Self-Awareness.

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